Tag Archives: Apple

Solving my eSATA > Thunderbolt Problems Once & For All

Promise Pegasus R6 RAID Array
Promise Pegasus R6

The time has come to lay my money down. On storage, that is. Real storage, not home-made hodge-podge RAID arrays that I’ve built myself throughout the years, just to save some money. Yes, it’s saved me a lot of money, but now that my current workstation has only Thunderbolt and no internal eSATA support (obviously it’s an iMac), the time has come to invest in a proper Thunderbolt RAID system.

At first I had been using an old Drobo 4-bay enclosure as my storage array, but of course that wasn’t fast enough to edit video. It was just used as an archive. Then I started making RAIDs out of various inexpensive external enclosures, until now. Currently, I am using two Vantec HX4R 4-bay enclosures with 8TB each on board, configured as RAID10. The HX4R is an eSATA device, but since the iMac doesn’t have eSATA ports, I had to hook them up through a LaCie eSATA>Thunderbolt hub.

The LaCie hub is a bit of a mixed blessing. On one hand, it is super-fast and works very well, when it works. For the most part, it’s fine, but it has a tendency to cause drives to unmount spontaneously. Of course, this is no good when you’re trying to work. To its credit, it never did it when the unit was under heavy use; only when it was mostly idle. But still, it’s not good for drives to be spontaneously ejected, of course. Lately, it’s been causing problems with one of my RAIDs, in the form of corrupted directories. It spent the last 48-hrs refusing to mount correctly, so I figured it is time for a change.

Tomorrow I will put my money down for a new Promise Pegasus R6 RAID array loaded with six 3TB drives. When searching for Thunderbolt RAIDs, the Pegasus kept coming up tops and the specs are good, so I figured it is worth a gamble. It’s expensive, but if it holds it end of the bargain, it will save me that much more money in wasted time. I will write a review of the Pegasus R6 after I’ve had some time with it.

Photos From Set

Cinematographer, Josh, on set with the AF100 and Atomos Samurai.
Cinematographer, Josh, on set with the AF100 and Atomos Samurai.

I love to support local filmmakers, especially students and those just starting out on their independent film careers. Last night, Branden, a friend and local film student, needed some help with a camera yesterday to finish shooting some scenes for his current film project, so I brought over my Samurai and AF100 for he and his crew to use. While I was there, I snapped a few pics for fun.

Mandy B. in makeup.
Mandy B. in makeup, ready for a scene with Branden.

The very talented Lawrence Mercado (http://notbotfx.com) was on hand to make up the lead actress to look like she’d been abused, and I must say Lawrence outdid himself. What an amazing job! The best part of the story is that she had to walk into a Walmart after the shoot, looking like that, because she needed to get makeup remover. Unfortunately, none of us had a GoPro to stick on her for that so we could record people’s reactions!

 

Sound Devices Adds 12-bit 4:4:4 Apple ProRes4444 support to Pix 240 & Pix 240i SSD Recorders

Sound Devices Pix 240i digital field recorder
Sound Devices Pix 240i

Sound Devices has added the ability to record 12-bit 4:4:4 over 3G-SDI (4:4:4 RGB/YCbCr) to its Pix 240 digital field recorder, laying down information at 330Mb/sec. Who can take advantage of this? If you’re shooting with a Canon C500, Sony F3, F5, F55, or Arri Alexa, you can. Also, some of the big Panasonic Varicams, as well as others. Let’s face it, if you have a 4:4:4 camera, you know it.

The upgrade is available to all current Pix 240 and Pix 240i customers free of charge (nice). From the Sound Devices press release:

SOUND DEVICES HIGHLIGHTS NEW 4:4:4 FEATURE FOR PIX 240 AND 240i AT THE 2013 NAB SHOW
Video Recorders Can Now Record 12-Bit, 4:4:4 Content to Apple ProRes 4444
LAS VEGAS, APRIL 4, 2013 — For attendees in search of the latest 4:4:4 recording solutions, Sound Devices showcases its latest upgrade to PIX 240 and PIX 240i Production Video Recorders at the 2013 NAB Show (Booth C2849). This new major update, available for all PIX customers free of charge, offers Apple ProRes 4444 recording from video sources over 3G-SDI (4:4:4 RGB or YCbCr). Recording 4:4:4 offers productions superior color precision for applications in chroma-keying, color-grading and multi-generational editing.
 
PIX 240 and 240i users now have the ability to record into Apple ProRes 4444, which offers impressive quality with 4:4:4 sources and workflows involving alpha channel transparency. With its 12-bit, 4:4:4 capability, the PIX 240 and 240i can record 330-Mbps Apple ProRes 4444 files that are perceptually indistinguishable from the original source material. Popular cameras with 4:4:4 capable outputs include the ARRI ALEXA, Canon C500 and Sony F3.
 
“Sound Devices is pleased to feature this latest firmware update at NAB, as we know this is an important feature to many of our users and we foresee this capability being a hot topic at this year’s show,” says Paul Isaacs, Technical Development Manager, Sound Devices. “Bringing Apple ProRes 4444 recording over 3G-SDI to the PIX 240 and 240i offers additional color accuracy available in a 4:4:4 environment—reinforcing the PIX recorder as a master-grade production recorder suitable for the most demanding production applications.”
 
Additional features available in this latest v3.0 firmware update include time-code and recording status displays on the SDI and HDMI outputs, up to 500 ms of audio delay to compensate for multi-device picture delay, and selectable 4:4:4 or 4:2:2 video output independent from the source material.
 
Users can connect PIX 240 and 240i to cameras with HD-SDI, 3G-SDI, or HDMI and record directly to QuickTime using a range of different Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD codecs, including Apple ProRes 4444. Since PIX recorders use ProRes and DNxHD, files recorded in the field can be used directly in post production, making for simpler, faster workflows.
 
The PIX 240i’s high-performance five-inch, IPS-based LCD display is an accurate field monitor, providing users with immediate confirmation of framing, exposure, focus,  audio metering and setup menu selections. It offers excellent color accuracy and contrast, great off-axis visibility and accurate motion tracking.
 
The built-in hardware scaler and frame rate converter allows PIX to output and record material at different resolutions and frame rates than supported by the camera. Conversion between HD and SD, with and without anamorphic conversion, is available.
 
The audio circuitry of the PIX recorders is based on Sound Devices’ award-winning 7-Series digital audio recorders. The low-noise (-128 dBu EIN), high-headroom, high-bandwidth inputs are mic/line switchable and include limiters, high-pass filters and phantom power.
 
The HDMI-only PIX 220 and PIX 220i video recorders also gain new features available in the new version 3.0 update, including Apple ProRes 4444 recording, time-code and recording status displays on HDMI outputs, and up to 500 ms of audio delay to compensate for multi-device picture delay.
 
Sound Devices, LLC designs and manufactures portable audio mixers, digital audio recorders, and digital video recorders and related equipment for feature film, episodic television, documentary, news-gathering, and acoustical test and measurement applications. The fourteen-year old company designs and manufactures from their Reedsburg, Wisconsin headquarters with additional offices in Madison, WI and Highland Park, IL. For more information, visit the Sound Devices website, www.sounddevices.com.

Apple Final Cut Pro X Keyboard Shortcut List PDF from Alex4D.com

This is pretty darned useful. Alexandre Gollner of Alex4D.com has gone to the trouble of making a PDF that lists all 423 keyboard commands available in Final Cut Pro X, complete with short descriptions of what each command does. You can get the PDF here.

Apple’s Final Cut Pro X as a Platform

I ran across this interesting post by Alex Gollner about Apple’s new patents, and how Final Cut Pro X could develop into a platform of its own. This is a good read. Sharing clips with collaborators and holding window-based chat sessions to discuss changes? Sign me up. Seems a lot easier than shipping hard drives back and forth…

Blackmagic Cinema Camera at NAB Show 2012 – Blackmagic Design

While roaming the NAB Show floor with my Panasonic AF100, I stopped to interview Dan May of Blackmagic Design, who talks about their new Blackmagic Cinema Camera (Canon EF mount only), which can record in RAW at a resolution of up to 2.5K. It is the first camera I’ve seen to feature a Thunderbolt out port for recording in highest resolution. This tells me that we can expect a lot more Thunderbolt accessories from Blackmagic in the near future. Personally, I find it unfortunate that Blackmagic has chosen to release the camera in EF mount only. I would think that Micro 4/3 would have been a much better choice considering it is a much more versatile mount. What do you think?

Watch this video on YouTube or on Easy Youtube.

AVID Video Editing Comes to iPad

Here’s something cool I ran across at Read Write Web. AVID has released an iPad video editing app, and for now, it’s only $4.99, but act fast! They plan on upping the price to $7.99 before too long. That extra three bucks will kill ya. I’m looking forward to trying out the new app. So far, my favorite iOS editor has been Reel Director; I hope AVID gives it a run for its money, simply because I like competition. It breeds better products, and better user experiences. Check it out in the App Store.

AVID video editor for iPad
AVID for iPad

Final Cut Pro X? No. iMovie Pro X? Sure.

I just got back into town from Dallas, and I’m really tired, so I’m going to bed. BUT, I wanted to post a word of warning beforehand, just in case I can save a poor soul or two from blowing $300.00 on Final Cut Pro X between now and tomorrow, when I get a chance to write a better post on the matter.

If you are expecting the new Final Cut Pro X to replace Studio, just get off that bus right now. I bought and installed it, and let me tell you that it has been WAY over-simplified. A video professional cannot make use of it to satisfy clients. You can’t even import or export XML or EDL files, so right away, working in DaVinci Resolve or Adobe After Effects is right out. Forget about it. Wait until Apple updates it and gives it the professional options it needs before you buy it.

That being said, it does have a lot of really cool stuff going on under the hood. Background rendering is really sweet, as is the native 64-bit processing. The in-app color tools are really nice, and there is a lot of other stuff that’s cool, but it is nowhere near ready for prime time. If you’re a hobbyist, or pro-am, go for it, but if you make your living via moving pixels, WAIT.