Tag Archives: cameras

Fun With The New Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 X-Mount Lens and a Fuji X-E1

I’ve been having a lot of fun with the new Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 X-mount lens. Up until now, I hadn’t had an autofocus lens for my Fuji X-E1. I didn’t buy the 35/1.4 Fuji lens for it, instead I opted for the body only and a host of X-mount adapters so I could use all of my old Leica LTM and M-mount lenses on it. That worked out pretty well, considering the X-E1 has a high-resolution EVF, twice as dense as the EVF in the X-Pro 1 body. Focusing manually using an X-E1 is a lot easier. I’ve also just learned that coming in July, Fuji is releasing a firmware update that will give the X-E1 and X-Pro1 EVF peaking, which will make MF so much easier; it’s something that X series owners have been screaming for since the cameras launched. I’m really happy that Fuji listened to us and finally delivered. I love the X-mount cameras, and this makes them that much more usable.

I took delivery of the Zeiss Touit 32/1.8 last week, and immediately took it with me to shoot another charreada. I got some great results, just screwing around in the dust. But I really saw the little Touit shine yesterday when I was shooting new photos for the band Phonolux, who needed some quick shots for their new EP before one of the band members left town for a month. It was a short-notice shoot, and the set was in their garage. And all we had for light were Home Depot clamp lights and a couple of small Arris. It was a very shallow set, and I had to be fairly close to my subjects, so it was nice to use a shorter lens with a more forgivable depth-of-field. I burned some frames on one of my FX Nikon bodies as well, but the X-E1’s APS-C sensor and shorter lens combination just work better for this particular shoot. Plus, the Zeiss lens is inherently sharper, and has more pop than much of the Nikon glass I have, with the exception of the 70-200/2.8 VR II, which is simply one of the sharpest lenses I’ve ever encountered, if not the sharpest.

Phonolux Band Photo
Phonolux Company Portrait

As you can see, I had to be pretty close to them to get the shot, so being able to use the shorter 32mm lens worked out well, since I also had to shoot at f/2.8 due to the light being so low. At 32mm f/2.8, at a shooting distance of about ten feet, I was still able to squeeze them all into a focal plane that allowed everyone to be sharp while still putting a little separation between the band members and the background.

Phonolux Band Photo
Phonolux Company Portrait

 

Detail from the Phonolux photo shoot set showcasing the sharpness of the Zeiss Touit 32/1.8 (Fuji X-Mount)
Detail from the Phonolux photo shoot set. I think this image really illustrates the stellar qualities of the little Touit lens. Sharpness and contrast are tops, and overall, the image rendered is nice and smooth, even at a higher ISO rating. 1/60 f/2.8 ISO 800

 

My First Image from the Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 Fuji X-mount Lens

I took delivery of my new Zeiss Touit 32/1.8 lens this morning from B&H. I couldn’t wait past the weekend so I had it overnighted, for when I’m impulse-buying photo gear, I have no patience. If I make a snap-decision, I want snap-delivery. I like to keep my gratification instant. The little Touit lens is well-built; very solid, as one would expect from Zeiss. And also, as I would expect from Zeiss, even their presentation oozed precision:

Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 Lens for Fuji X-Mount
Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 Lens for Fuji X-Mount

I immediately mounted the Touit onto my X-E1 and ran around looking for something to make a picture of, and finally settled on making a picture of J. as she was having streaks put in her hair by Kim. I have a couple of shoots lined up for this weekend, so I will be sure to put the lens to the test then, but for now, I have to say that I’m already in love with the Zeiss Touit 32. It’s as sharp as you expect a Zeiss to be, and smooth as butter. The AF works well, and is plenty fast enough for my tastes, and I’m used to shooting with Nikon D3 bodies. I’ll see if I can get a few more photos when we go out to dinner with some friends later this evening. Until then, here’s one pic:

Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 Lens for Fuji X-Mount
Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 lens sample image, shot with Fuji X-E1.

NAB 2013 Show Highlight Reel No. 2

I decided that since there was so much cool stuff to see at NAB, the best way to get the most coverage is to make highlight reels of my favorite items. So that’s what I’m doing. Here is the second highlight reel, featuring products like the Freefly MoVI camera stabilizer, the Atomos Connect HD-SDI to HDMI converter, the Redrock Micro One Man Crew motorized parabolic slider, the Schneider TS-PC 50mm f/2.8 lens, the MTF Effect Canon EF lens controller, and a shark. Check it out!

Watch this video on YouTube or on Easy Youtube.

Watch this video on YouTube or on Easy Youtube.

Sound Devices Adds 12-bit 4:4:4 Apple ProRes4444 support to Pix 240 & Pix 240i SSD Recorders

Sound Devices Pix 240i digital field recorder
Sound Devices Pix 240i

Sound Devices has added the ability to record 12-bit 4:4:4 over 3G-SDI (4:4:4 RGB/YCbCr) to its Pix 240 digital field recorder, laying down information at 330Mb/sec. Who can take advantage of this? If you’re shooting with a Canon C500, Sony F3, F5, F55, or Arri Alexa, you can. Also, some of the big Panasonic Varicams, as well as others. Let’s face it, if you have a 4:4:4 camera, you know it.

The upgrade is available to all current Pix 240 and Pix 240i customers free of charge (nice). From the Sound Devices press release:

SOUND DEVICES HIGHLIGHTS NEW 4:4:4 FEATURE FOR PIX 240 AND 240i AT THE 2013 NAB SHOW
Video Recorders Can Now Record 12-Bit, 4:4:4 Content to Apple ProRes 4444
LAS VEGAS, APRIL 4, 2013 — For attendees in search of the latest 4:4:4 recording solutions, Sound Devices showcases its latest upgrade to PIX 240 and PIX 240i Production Video Recorders at the 2013 NAB Show (Booth C2849). This new major update, available for all PIX customers free of charge, offers Apple ProRes 4444 recording from video sources over 3G-SDI (4:4:4 RGB or YCbCr). Recording 4:4:4 offers productions superior color precision for applications in chroma-keying, color-grading and multi-generational editing.
 
PIX 240 and 240i users now have the ability to record into Apple ProRes 4444, which offers impressive quality with 4:4:4 sources and workflows involving alpha channel transparency. With its 12-bit, 4:4:4 capability, the PIX 240 and 240i can record 330-Mbps Apple ProRes 4444 files that are perceptually indistinguishable from the original source material. Popular cameras with 4:4:4 capable outputs include the ARRI ALEXA, Canon C500 and Sony F3.
 
“Sound Devices is pleased to feature this latest firmware update at NAB, as we know this is an important feature to many of our users and we foresee this capability being a hot topic at this year’s show,” says Paul Isaacs, Technical Development Manager, Sound Devices. “Bringing Apple ProRes 4444 recording over 3G-SDI to the PIX 240 and 240i offers additional color accuracy available in a 4:4:4 environment—reinforcing the PIX recorder as a master-grade production recorder suitable for the most demanding production applications.”
 
Additional features available in this latest v3.0 firmware update include time-code and recording status displays on the SDI and HDMI outputs, up to 500 ms of audio delay to compensate for multi-device picture delay, and selectable 4:4:4 or 4:2:2 video output independent from the source material.
 
Users can connect PIX 240 and 240i to cameras with HD-SDI, 3G-SDI, or HDMI and record directly to QuickTime using a range of different Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD codecs, including Apple ProRes 4444. Since PIX recorders use ProRes and DNxHD, files recorded in the field can be used directly in post production, making for simpler, faster workflows.
 
The PIX 240i’s high-performance five-inch, IPS-based LCD display is an accurate field monitor, providing users with immediate confirmation of framing, exposure, focus,  audio metering and setup menu selections. It offers excellent color accuracy and contrast, great off-axis visibility and accurate motion tracking.
 
The built-in hardware scaler and frame rate converter allows PIX to output and record material at different resolutions and frame rates than supported by the camera. Conversion between HD and SD, with and without anamorphic conversion, is available.
 
The audio circuitry of the PIX recorders is based on Sound Devices’ award-winning 7-Series digital audio recorders. The low-noise (-128 dBu EIN), high-headroom, high-bandwidth inputs are mic/line switchable and include limiters, high-pass filters and phantom power.
 
The HDMI-only PIX 220 and PIX 220i video recorders also gain new features available in the new version 3.0 update, including Apple ProRes 4444 recording, time-code and recording status displays on HDMI outputs, and up to 500 ms of audio delay to compensate for multi-device picture delay.
 
Sound Devices, LLC designs and manufactures portable audio mixers, digital audio recorders, and digital video recorders and related equipment for feature film, episodic television, documentary, news-gathering, and acoustical test and measurement applications. The fourteen-year old company designs and manufactures from their Reedsburg, Wisconsin headquarters with additional offices in Madison, WI and Highland Park, IL. For more information, visit the Sound Devices website, www.sounddevices.com.

2013 NAB Show Highlight Reel No.1

Cooke 40mm T2.3 2X Anamorphic Prime Lens
Cooke 40mm T2.3 2X Anamorphic Prime Lens

I’ve decided that since there is so much cool new stuff to see at NAB, the best way to get the most bang for my buck on coverage is to make highlight reels of my favorite attractions. So that’s what I’m doing. Here is the first highlight reel, featuring products like the Blackmagic 4K Production Camera, the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, the Atomos Samurai Blade ProRes & DNxHD field recorder, and the new Cooke 2X Anamorphic Prime Lens.

Watch this video on YouTube or on Easy Youtube.

The next highlight reel will feature the Digital Bolex, the new MoVI camera stabilizer, and more! I’m heading down to the show floor as soon as I finish typing this coming exclamation point!

2013 NAB Show – Interview with Digital Bolex Creator Joe Rubinstein – Part 2

Digital Bolex S16 Cinema Camera - cinematography
Digital Bolex S16 Cinema Camera

On my first day at NAB 2013, I ran into Digital Bolex creator Joe Rubinstein, who was kind enough to tell me about the new cinema camera that every cinematographer is dying to get their hands on. Joe was really nice, and I really enjoyed talking with him about his camera; it was obvious that he is just as passionate about the Digital Bolex, and what it means to cinematographers, as are the camera nerds who are waiting for it to ship.

In part 2 of the interview, Joe talks about the software the comes with the Digital Bolex, as well as the workflow for the 2K Cinema DNG files it writes to CF cards.

In case you haven’t heard about the Digital Bolex, it’s a Kickstarter-funded Super 16 cinema camera that shoots in RAW Cinema DNG format. Since it features a smaller 16mm size imager (CCD too, which means NO rolling shutter), it can make use of a myriad of older 16mm and C-mount lenses that have largely fallen into disuse since the rise in popularity of DSLR’s and other larger-chip digital cameras. Check out part 2 of my interview with Joe Rubinstein below.

Watch this video on YouTube or on Easy Youtube.

2013 NAB Show – Interview With Digital Bolex Creator Joe Rubinstein – Part 1

Digital Bolex S16 Cinema Camera - cinematography
Digital Bolex S16 Cinema Camera

On my first day at NAB 2013, I ran into Digital Bolex creator Joe Rubinstein, who was kind enough to tell me about the new cinema camera that every cinematographer is dying to get their hands on. Joe was really nice, and I really enjoyed talking with him about his camera; it was obvious that he is just as passionate about the Digital Bolex, and what it means to cinematographers, as are the camera nerds who are waiting for it to ship.

In part 1 of the interview, Joe talks about the camera body and lens options that will be available for it, including the custom Digital Bolex prime lenses that were designed in a partnership with Kish Optics.

In case you haven’t heard about the Digital Bolex, it’s a Kickstarter-funded Super 16 cinema camera that shoots in RAW Cinema DNG format. Since it features a smaller 16mm size imager (CCD too, which means NO rolling shutter), it can make use of a myriad of older 16mm and C-mount lenses that have largely fallen into disuse since the rise in popularity of DSLR’s and other larger-chip digital cameras. Check out part 1 of my interview with Joe Rubinstein below.

Watch this video on YouTube or on Easy Youtube.

Cooke Kinic 1″ f/1.5 lens (coated version) on Panasonic AF100 Camera

Cooke Kinic lens on Panasonic AF100 video camera
Cooke Kinic 1″ f/1.5 (coated version) mounted to my Panasonic AF100 video camera.

So, I did something cool today. I took an old Cooke Kinic 1″ (25mm) f/1.5 lens made by Taylor Taylor & Hobson c. 1950, and mounted it to my Panasonic AF100 video camera. The Kinic is known as the king of the vertigo lenses, as it produces some amazing swirly bokeh around the outside of the frame. Some call it nausea-inducing, and I can see their point. I’m not sure if TTH meant to do this or not, but considering that Cooke lenses are known for their exceptional quality all the way back to the 19th century, I’d like to think they did.

Taylor Hobson Cooke Kinic 1" f/1.5 lens mounted on my Panasonic AF100 AVCHD video camera
A closer view of the coated front element of the Taylor Hobson Cooke Kinic 1″ f/1.5 lens (c. 1950) mounted on my Panasonic AF100 video camera

The Kinic was originally made for 16mm movie cameras like the Eyemo and Filmo models. If anyone knows of sample footage from these cameras where the Kinic was used, please let me know; I’d like to see what the image looks like. Personally, I think the Kinic is fabulous for special effects shots like dream sequences, flashbacks, etc. I certainly wouldn’t use it for everyday footage, since the AF100’s imager is much larger than the 16mm frame that the Kinic was originally intended for, where the ultra-swirly outer edges of the picture would not be visible. // Below is some footage I shot in my front yard. This is not raw footage; it has been graded using DaVinci Resolve 9. Check it out:

Shooting Soccer with the Panasonic AF100 and a Fujinon 10×4.8 ENG lens

I’ve been dialing in my ENG-ized AF100 for some time now. Recently, I added a Varavon lens support to relieve some tension from the not-so-robust Micro 4/3 mount. The Varavon works really well, and I especially like that it has a rubber strap that holds the lens down onto the post suport. This not only provides negative-G stability, but also prevents the lens from torquing the mount when I’m using the ENG hand grip.

Darren Abate shooting with a Panasonic AF100 and Fujinon ENG lens at a San Antonio Scorpions soccer game
I’ve found my new Superhero pose. Thanks to Tony Morano for the pic of me shooting the Scorpions game on July 4th.

On July 4th, I was hired by the San Antonio Scorpions professional soccer team to shoot some b-roll before and during their game against FC Edmonton. I thought this would be the perfect chance to try out the new rig. I wanted to make it as light as possible, so I elected to remove the Anton Bauer plate and battery, which powers the lens’ servo zoom, and just roll using manual zoom instead. The total package consisted of AF100 body, Fujinon 10×4.8 Super-wide ENG lens, rails, Atomos Samurai, and a Cineroid Metal HD-SDI EVF.

The client wanted 720/30p for web and broadcast use. I set the Samurai to record ProRes422 LT and it looked great. A lot of people overlook LT but it’s superb when you want to save space and you’re not going to be doing heavy color moves in post. Even though it’s “LT” it’s still a heck of a lot better than AVCHD. I recently switched to Intel X25 SSDs in the Samurai, and I couldn’t be happier with them. Fast and tough. That’s all I can ask for. I was using a Corsair SSD, and after three RMAs from failed drives, the switch to Intel was needed.

Here is a two-minute reel of raw clips from Wednesday night. These are ungraded, straight from the camera:

Watch this video on YouTube or on Easy Youtube.

Comparison: Panasonic AF100, Sony F3, ARRI Alexa, RED, EX1/3

I ran across this old blog post at ProVideoCoalition.com that features a fairly comprehensive comparison of the resolving powers of the Panasonic AF100 and the Sony PMW-F3, among other cameras such as the Sony EX3 and EX1, the ARRI Alexa and the RED Mysterium. It’s a pretty interesting and tech-heavy read.

http://provideocoalition.com/index.php/awilt/story/ag-af100_and_pmw-f3_on_the_charts/P0/